Children, obey your parents in the Lord, for this is right. “Honor your father and mother” (this is the first commandment with a promise), that it may go well with you and that you may live long in the land. Fathers, do not provoke your children to anger, but bring them up in the discipline and instruction of the Lord. (Eph 6:1-4)

Here are a few fun stories just for parents and children.

The Monkey and the Fish

Parents, you can learn the story and share it with your kids or watch the video with your kids.

For Parents

Just for fun, ask your children to retell the story in their own words.

Here are some discussion questions for you and your children:

  • Have you ever seen a fish out of water? How did he act?
  • How did the monkey think he was helping the fish?
  • Did the monkey really help the fish? Why?
  • How have you tried to help others?
  • Have you ever been like the monkey? What was that like?
  • Have you ever felt like the fish? How did you feel?
  • What story in the Bible reminds you about the story of the monkey and the fish?

Compare the story of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-37) to the story of the Monkey and Fish

  • What does the story of the Good Samaritan teach us about God?
  • What does the story teach us about people?
  • What is the principle of the story that we should follow?
  • How can we be Good Samaritan’s to our neighbors and friends?

Shhh! Don’t Wake The Sleeping Giant!

For Parents

Here are some discussion questions for you and your children:

  • Did that story scare you? What scared you about it?
  • Which character in the story scared you the most?
  • Was it an adventurous story? What excited you about it?

Compare the story of the sleeping giant with the story of Jesus being tempted in the Bible (Luke 4:1-13)

  • What does this story of the temptation teach us about God? About Jesus?
  • What does the story teach us about people?
  • Is there a principle to the story that we should follow?
  • How does the story help us to not be afraid?

The Two Woodcutters

For Parents

Just for fun, ask your children to retell the story in their own words.

Here are some discussion questions for you and your children:

  • Which woodcutter did you expect to have more wood? Why?
  • Why is it surprising that they second woodcutter had more wood?
  • Why would sharpening your axe make a difference?
  • How do you think the first woodcutter felt when he saw the second one’s wood pile?
  • How do you think the second woodcutter felt when he was being question by the first?

Compare the story of the two woodcutters to the story of the ten maidens (Matt 25:1-13)

  • What does the story teach us about God?
  • What does the story teach us about people?
  • What is the principle of the story that we should follow?
  • How does the story help us to use wisdom in how we use our resources?

Petunia the Goose

coming soon!

For Parents

Here are some discussion questions for you and your children:

  • Which of Petunia’s friends did you like the most? Why?
  • What made Petunia so proud?
  • In all her wisdom, who did she really help?
  • What was the lesson that Petunia learned at the end of the book?

Compare the story of Petunia with the story about Nicodemus (John 3:1-18).

  • What does the story teach us about God and Jesus?
  • What does the story teach us about people?
  • Is there a principle in the story that we should follow?
  • How does this story help us to trust in Jesus’s words?

Jesus and Children

Now they were bringing even infants to him that he might touch them. And when the disciples saw it, they rebuked them. But Jesus called them to him, saying, “Let the children come to me, and do not hinder them, for to such belongs the kingdom of God. Truly, I say to you, whoever does not receive the kingdom of God like a child shall not enter it.” Luke 18:15-17

Discussion questions

  • How do the kids learn about Jesus?
  • Name three miracles Jesus performs.
  • Name three things Jesus teaches.
  • What does Jesus mean to you?
  • Is He your Savior?

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